Debtor-Creditor & Bankruptcy Litigation

Over the past several years, we have secured over $5 billion in total creditor recoveries and repeatedly have prevailed in some of the most high-profile and complicated restructuring disputes in the world.

Robbins Russell has extensive experience litigating debtor-creditor and bankruptcy-related disputes at both the trial and the appellate level. We frequently represent individual creditors, their trustees, ad hoc groups, and creditors’ committees in contract disputes; fraudulent conveyance and voidable preference actions; creditor derivative actions; and intercreditor disputes.

Over the past several years, we have secured over $5 billion in total creditor recoveries and repeatedly have prevailed in some of the most high-profile and complicated restructuring disputes in the world.

We regularly partner, as litigation or conflicts counsel, with corporate and restructuring practices at other law firms, and with foreign counsel prosecuting our clients’ interests in proceedings abroad. We also provide independent litigation analysis to clients looking for new investment opportunities.

Our recent and notable work in this area includes:

  • In re TOUSA, Inc.: Secured a judgment in excess of $500 million for the Official Committee of Unsecured Creditors in a fraudulent conveyance action successfully litigated in the United States Bankruptcy Court for the Southern District of Florida and ultimately affirmed on appeal by the Eleventh Circuit.  680 F.3d 1298 (2012).
  • Argentina: Secured settlements in excess of $4 billion that resolved fifteen years of litigation on defaulted sovereign debt.
  • Puerto Rico: Representing, as litigation counsel, an ad hoc group of creditors that hold General Obligation debt of the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico.
  • Chesapeake Energy Corp. v. Bank of New York Mellon:  Secured a judgment worth in excess of $380 million for an indenture trustee in a dispute regarding a bond buyback that was litigated in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York and affirmed (twice) by the Second Circuit.